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School Connectedness Mitigates Depression

The possible role of school connectedness in preventing depression and suicide and related behaviors has received considerable attention in the last decade. Research has shown that higher levels of school connectedness are linked with reduced depressive symptoms and suicidal behavior in children and adolescents (Resnick et al., 1997; Whitlock et al., 2014; Logan, 2009; Langille et al., 2012; Shochet et al., 2006). (Sampasa-Kanyinga & Hamilton (2015). Does socioeconomic status moderate the relationships between school connectedness with psychological distress, suicidal ideation and attempts in adolescents?) Preventive Medicine 87, 11–17 ).


School connectedness, also known as school attachment, school climate or school bonding, is the belief among students that teachers and other adults within the school care about them as individuals and care about their learning (Wingspread Declaration on School Connections, 2004). Research studies have shown that students who feel connected to school are more likely to have a number of positive health and academic outcomes (Bond et al., 2007; Dornbusch et al., 2001; Resnick et al., 1993; Shochet et al., 2007). School connectedness has also been shown to be a key protective factor that lowers the risk of engaging in health-compromising behavior in youth. (Sampasa-Kanyinga & Hamilton (2015). Does socioeconomic status moderate the relationships between school connectedness with psychological distress, suicidal ideation and attempts in adolescents?) Preventive Medicine 87, 11–17 ).


School connectedness is based on students' sense of attachment and commitment to school as well as their involvement in school (Catalano et al., 2004). Previous research has shown that higher levels of school connectedness are linked with reduced depressive symptoms and suicidal behavior in children and adolescents (Resnick et al., 1997; Whitlock et al., 2014; Logan, 2009; Langille et al., 2012; Shochet et al., 2006). Based on these studies' results, fostering school connectedness has been considered as a practical evidence-based strategy for mental health promotion (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2008). (Sampasa-Kanyinga & Hamilton (2015). Does socioeconomic status moderate the relationships between school connectedness with psychological distress, suicidal ideation and attempts in adolescents?) Preventive Medicine 87, 11–17 ).


IINII uses a revolutionary Design Thinking process to help your school community gain an understanding of one’s sense of self, as well as developing an understanding of students’ and parents’ values; having an understanding of one’s values matters because research has shown that it is linked to better well-being, less stress, and increased confidence in one’s ability to succeed.


Understanding students’ values can be developed with culturally sustaining practices that reflect a student’s identity and experience. Particularly helpful is focusing efforts on cultural competence and relevance and providing opportunities for students to practice bridging differences between diverse identities in a safe environment. To learn how you can create a dynamic youth-centered environment that honors the unique values of your students and parents, visit our website at www.iinii.org, or contact us at iinii@iinii.org or 1800-507-2502.



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